From the Presidential Medal
of Freedom presentation

Warren E. Buffett : as a world-known investor and philanthropist, Warren E. Buffett business acumen is matched only by his dedication to improve the lives of others. He is the co/founder of the Giving Pledge, an
organization that encourages wealthy Americans to donate at least 50percent of their wealth to philanthropic causes.

Warren Buffett’s example of Generosity and Compassion has shown us the power of one individual’s determination in inspiring countless women and men to help make our world a brighter place.

Last posts

All the rest is noise

Marcus Aurelius wrote his “Meditations” as a reminder to himself to daily practice the virtues he sought in life. He wasn’t trying to be a teacher and he probably didn’t expect to be a writer. I think we should try in our personal and professional life to do just the same, Focus on our own goals, not on what others think or expect from us.  

How miserable life would be if one tried merely to impress others. A life many people spend buying things they don’t like to impress people that don’t like them, desperately trying to be recognized or remembered without investing any time getting clarity, peace of mind, or gaining wisdom.   

How difficult is to recognize all the extrinsic factors that can only harm you? How difficult is to ask yourself: “Am I in control of my emotions and my life? Am I possessed by my properties or material things or do I possess them?” “Am I ready and prepared to face the storm?” Am I able to exercise with Wisdom and intention my “reasoned choice”, as Epictetus called it? And am I capable of understanding what is behind my “reasoned choice” and what is just opinion, or is out of my control?  

We force ourselves to do many things, just because everybody is doing it. We end up losing control of our lives and our goals and desires. We do things that have no impact on us achieving our true goals and desires, all because we don’t simply take the time to ascertain what we really want in our life. If, on a rare occasion, one finds the time to do so, more often than not, one isn’t emotionally prepared to handle it and is even afraid to discover what is really important. So we don’t even try and yet, we’re still afraid of failing. Stoics say: just try. Nobody can be perfect and not everyone can be a sage. But trying means to be a better person than the day before. And if done with determination every day, it could lead to more happiness and tranquility than rage or tediousness. Stoics (just like Buffett) try to “Enjoy every day” in this wonderful journey called life; this always surprising pursuit in which you can “spend each day as if it were your last”, and as Marcus Aurelius wrote: “Without frenzy, laziness or any pretending”. 

There’s a lot of the Stoic philosophy in the unpretentious, but solid viewpoint of the world in the great “Value Investors”. It’s unplanned incidentally, because it’s a natural outcome of the common sense that is not regarded as precious as it really is because it seems too simple. Its principles for living a good life are “just so simple” as Charlie Munger said numerous times. In my experience, it is not always easy when you really have to apply those principles and values to your everyday life. Especially in 2021, a world in which noise is constant and overwhelming. And the strength required to cut it must be great. That’s why for me, today more than ever, the Stoics and their vision are critical for a happy life and happy investing. We need to have a sound mind, that can think and live outside the box, while not being reclusive or withdrawn. Observing all that is around us with bright eyes and inquisitive brains. All the rest is just noise.  

Feel free to stoically gather together your thoughts about this article and send me a comment to:

marco@blikebuffett.com 

The power of Inactivity

I’ve experienced as a business owner what hard work really means; working from 04.30 am to midnight, driven by a burning desire to accomplish your goals. In my case, the few years committed to working in this unrealistic way, combined with a specific talent for the Real Estate brokerage business, paid off.

But then, at a certain point, you have to stop and think. You have to find the time to ask yourself where you are going with it all. Ask yourself if you’re managing your life in the way you want to and how and if you’re getting what you want to. Moreover, you must ask yourself if there’s a way to accomplish more by doing less. The truth is, it may be not worth working like a mad dog your entire life, even if you like the business you are in. There are few people who sincerely dislike having friends or going out to a nice restaurant with someone you enjoy spending time with. Or maybe even experiencing the joy of having a son or a daughter to share your life with.

And what if taking the time to do nothing would bring more profitability to you in the long term? What if your level of happiness and ability to better analyze things (at a slower pace) would increase your chance of making more money in the future?

Often what is counter-intuitive is worth considering. Contemplate this: in life and in the investment world, every now and then you have to take the road less traveled. The most important thing is that you do so after thinking it over rationally. If you just jump from one meeting to another and your day is constantly full of appointments, you’ll probably miss the next big opportunity; the one that you should be ready for because you’re unlikely to get a second chance at. Remember such opportunities come to those who are prepared and are able to recognize those opportunities as opportunities.

Those who minds sifted through all the noise and the hustle and bustle to make decisions based on facts and reasoning. The independent thinkers who took enough time being ‘idle’ to equip themselves emotionally to identify these opportunities. It is important to take advantage of the downtime you had in the in the past to be ready for when the right time comes, and you have to take a swing. And to just take a small swing, (“doing it in a small scale”says Warren), is basically the same as not doing it all; in your investment life you will not find many big opportunities. If your facts and reasoning are right; if they are in your area of competence, it doesnt matter who agrees with you or not. You gotta swing.

So, in the end, (as usual) the majority of things everybody believes about money and investment is wrong. They think it must be complicated and you have to look for risky options to get rich and make money; that it is exhausting, takes complete dedication, and more busywork that most people could endure. Well, it’s not true. It requires more, actually. It requires sophisticated slacking. A path that is, pretty much uncharted, and unique for every human being. If it truly were only sweat and taking risks, then almost anybody could do it. Your burning desire to succeed must drive you to the adventure you love, not into slavery just for money.

If it turns you on, it will be successful. If it drives your best thoughts and qualities, it will make you happy. And rich.

Sono occupato, sto pensando..

Intendiamoci, io sono un naturale “hard worker” e non ho nulla contro i grandi lavoratori. Non parliamo di questo. Io vorrei sottolineare come l’iperattività forzata non porti i risultati che si crede. Se lavoro molto è perchè forse non lavoro mai. Investo con coraggio del tempo a trovare cio’ che soddisfa la mia natura. Persisto a concentrarmi seriamente su cio’ che mi riesce meglio e mi piace fare e lascio perdere il resto. O almeno ci provo. Ci ho messo anni per riuscirci. Odio per esempio il bricolage ed i lavori manuali. Perchè dovrei imparare a farli (male) togliendo il lavoro ad un bravo handyman? E’ facile solo a dirsi, infatti la maggior parte delle persone perde questa concentrazione e spreca la vita attendendo la fine del supplizio quotidiano che sopporta dal lunedi’ al venerdi’. Spendere 5 giorni per guadagnarne 2 non mi sembra un “good arbitrage”. L’attesa della pensione è un’altra tragedia che non condivido.

Piu’ che il lusso, il denaro, la capacità di comprare “comforts”, nella vita gioca a favore della felicita’ un genuino, quotidiano  entusiasmo svincolato dal “dovere”. Senza poter scegliere di essere inattivi e senza la giusta distanza da troppi stimoli esterni è difficile rimanere concentrati sulle cose o sulle persone realmente importanti per noi. Trovate il tempo per rifletterci…

(..continua..) 

Feel free to send your comments in italian or english at:

marco@blikebuffett.com

Non fare molto, sarà un successo..

L’efficienza o meglio il suo mito puo’ uccidervi. Cosi’ come la famosa frase “a tutti i costi” anche il principio “efficienza e produttività sempre” e nessun tempo morto.. puo’ mettere piu’ facilmente voi in cassa da morto che il tempo. Il concetto stesso di tempo morto è inesistente per l’uomo saggio che sa maneggiare il “saper far niente”.

L’otium dei latini di scolastica memoria puo’ essere uno dei piu’ sofisticati e al tempo stesso produttivi impieghi del tempo che ci è concesso. Sia da dedicare al business che alla vita in generale. Non avere un minuto perchè sempre impegnati in qualcosa e appena liberi ri-impegnarsi a colmare il vuoto nell’agenda è una autocondanna  al che le cose non migliorino, non progrediscano e non cambino.

I businesses piu’ produttivi e le attività piu’ remunerative sono quelle in cui si pensa. E pensare richiede uno sforzo di serenità e riposo che solo il saper fare niente puo’ regalare. Ritagliarsi il proprio tempo e proteggerlo lontano dagli ossessionati del multitasking e dei lavori forzati è un lavoro dal quale la persona di successo non puo’ sottrarsi. A lungo termine i risultati sono prodigiosi. A breve termine l’ilarità e il ghigno dei nemici del “benessere” (sia economico che spirituale) saranno la vostra momentanea ricompensa.

Sembrare efficienti è il contrario della concretezza. Fare le cose per farle e avere la sensazione di essere efficienti porta alla mancanza di pianificazione e di analisi dei risultati “veri”. Dei fatti concreti. Una giornata troppo densa o una settimana stra-piena possono essere anche generatrici di errori e di danni irreparabili (o che durano mesi o anni). Sbagliare è importante ed istruttivo nel mondo del business (ne abbiamo molti esempi) e puo’ non essere “Tempo perso” riparare i danni causati. Ma io personalmente preferisco imparare dagli errori degli altri piu’ che dai miei.  E per imparare debbo “sprecare” qualche ora a pensare e studiare a fondo cio’ che realmente puo’ arricchirmi a lungo termine e conviene fare.  E soprattutto cio’ che conviene non fare. Magari perchè è semplicemente troppo difficile. Dire “NO, grazie”. Essere ‘”old school” nel gestire la propria agenda è oggi piu’ che mai oro. Rilassatevi prima di pensare a grossi affari. Di solito i meno “efficaci” (e pure deboli) sono coloro che devono pomparsi la mente con concetti-steroidi che prevedono di anestetizzare le “small talk” ed essere solo business in ogni singolo efficiente istante della giornata.

Buffett durante una acquisition enorme delle sue se ne ando’ a vedere a teatro la recita dei nipoti. In una puntata di “The secret millionaires club” insegna come abbia un solo unico impegno a cui dedicarsi nel corso di tutta la settimana. E prima di iniziare a lavorarci si mette a suonare l’hukulele. Non solo, in questo modo gli rimane tutto il tempo libero per fronteggiare eventuali imprevisti o emergenze. E quindi agire, subito. Vigore e determinazione di acciaio usano lo spazio e il tempo attorno di cui hanno bisogno per scoccare il colpo giusto al momento giusto. Siete sempre a navigare tra il fumo dei meetings, riunioni, groups, power teams etc? Se non avete tempo per fermarvi e cercare il vostro mondo, vi costringete a vivere nel mondo che gli altri costruiscono per voi.

(..continua…)

“Pensa che ti passa”

Vi consiglio un libro in italiano che mi ha seguito in valigia e poi in tasca nel recente arrivo a Roma dagli States. Breve ma efficacissimo: “Pensa che ti passa” di Francesco Muzzarelli  (Emi, gli infralibri) Sottotitolo: “Usare la testa per non farsi male”. Va via d’un fiato ed è un piacere per chi come noi è interessato da sempre ad usare la Razionalità e “non farsi male”(non solo finanziariamente). Ma, soprattutto, inserisco questa mia piccola recensione sotto la categoria “The Business of Life” perchè, come ho scritto spesso in precedenti articoli, prima di ogni avventura deve esserci un corretto esercizio di gestione delle proprie emozioni e della propria vita. Come vediamo e come affrontiamo le cose è il filtro principale che ci permette di vivere al meglio il nostro diritto alla Felicità. Come interpretiamo gli inevitabili ostacoli dell’esistenza e come reagiamo e conviviamo, se necessario, con essi?  Muzzarelli, partendo dal “Sursum Corda” (in alto i cuori!) ci porta per mano in un breve ma affascinante viaggio tra cervello e cuore e attraverso il nostro sistema nervoso. Ben Franklin, Warren Buffett e Charlie Munger, piu’ la mia defunta zia nata nel 1926, sarebbero molto daccordo con l’autore. Tutti loro non dimenticano mai di rammentarmi che la forza del carattere e del temperamento e’ cio’ che contraddistingue il grande investitore e l’uomo equilibrato che non si lascia travolgere dalle emozioni nei momenti cruciali. Io ho imparato tanto da questi grandi per non cedere mai alla disperazione e al vittimismo, e ho trovato in questa piccola “guida” di Muzzarelli, un riassunto, quasi un breviario, che si puo’ leggere e rileggere anche a piccoli pezzi, aprendolo e riaprendolo a caso. Pezzetti, ogni giorno, magari al mattino, prima di iniziare a fare “danni” a noi stessi e agli altri lasciando troppo aperte le valvole dell’istinto e le impennate dell'”amigdala”. Siamo tutti umani, è un percorso da affrontare a piccoli passi e da rinnovare e costruire ogni ora, ogni giorno. Cio’ che pensiamo del nostro presente, come guidiamo i nostri pensieri sull’oggi e sul futuro, influisce sulle nostre scelte e quindi sulle inevitabili conseguenze di esse.  Come interpretiamo accadimenti e realtà e come possiamo intervenire e vederci a nostro agio in essa sono la chiave della nostro vero “stare bene”. Ricordatevi, non saranno i soldi (oltre certo un livello minimo che garantisce i bisogni primari) a garantire per forza il nostro successo (successo “a tutti i costi” è una frase pericolosa!). L’idea del successo,ha detto Warren una volta, e’ talmente personale che io non so cosa possa essere. Ma so cos’è la Felicità, perchè io sono felice e mi godo (so godermi) ogni giorno la vita. Mi piace la vita che faccio (comprese le sue inevitabili difficoltà) perchè l’ho costruita giorno dopo giorno senza rinunciare ad essere me stesso. A scegliere cio’ che va bene al mio essere “Io”. Come mi disse nel 2004 Ted Greene : “Marco, tu devi essere Marco“. Per me ha significato Rincorri cio’ che ti fa felice, che si adatta al tuo carattere e alle tue caratteristiche e qualità. Trova cio’ per cui sei realmente portato. Accetta i limiti ed i difetti e stai lontano da cio’ che non conosci, non capisci e che ti potrà fare male. Non significa non avventurarsi, anzi! Significa al contrario scegli la giusta avventura e preparati ad accettare gli errori che farai, perchè ci saranno. Inevitabilmente. Ragionando cosi’ la quantità di disagi e dolori che ho evitato è stata sorprendente.La quantità di maggiore Felicità acquisita cosi’ negli ultimi 18 anni e’ stata sorprendente. Con essa e’ aumentata anche la ricchezza netta, il patrimonio materiale ed il mio patrimonio di relazioni, amicizie, umiltà e disponibilità verso gli altri. Vedo nell’altro le mie stesse difficoltà e penso che forse ha avuto anche una giornata peggiore della mia, prima di giudicarlo sommariamente.

La quantità di conoscenza, e libri letti che mi hanno regalato molte piu’ ore gradevoli? Una ricchezza incalcolabile. Mi hanno regalato anche l’accettazione di una “ignoranza enciclopedica” che porto in giro con me con orgoglio. Noi leggiamo, leggiamo e cerchiamo ogni giorno di migliorare e cosi’ ci sentiamo felicemente inadeguati. Accettiamo l’inevitabile: la forza di gravità dei nostri limiti. Grazie a questi ultimi e non alla presunzione riusciamo a volare se vogliamo, persino chiusi in una stanza o costretti a “scrivere da un cuscino”. Sentirsi a proprio agio con il disagio è la vera forza e la vera garanzia di Felicità. Francesco Muzzarelli ha capito e scritto con semplicità (meglio di me) molte cose come queste nel suo agile libro. E lo ringrazio per averlo scritto in maniera semplice ma non banale, alla portata di tutti, ma rigoroso. Charlie Munger ha detto una volta che le risposte dovrebbero essere tre: “Si, No, e Troppo Difficile”. La cassettina con dentro le pratiche troppo difficili che Warren ha sulla sua scrivania in ufficio ad Omaha Nebraska, è la piu’ importante. E’ nostro compito capire cosa dovrebbe starci dentro e soprattutto cosa ancora ci “arrovelliamo” e carbonizziamo il cervello e l’anima a tenere fuori.

Se penso a quante cose potevano andare storte oggi è un miracolo che sono qua al sicuro a scrivere al Computer quello che mi pare. In definitiva l’obiettivo è “pensare” come Warren (o almeno provarci) per potere con sincerità arrivare a rispondere come lui a chi ci chiede “Come stai?” :la frase “Im delighted to be here”.  “Sono Felice di essere qui” .

Stay Happy, 

Marco Turco 

marco@blikebuffett.com

“Everyone seems to believe it..”

A few years ago, when I was in Warsaw for my CFA level I preparation course, an “academician” (professor) knowing my passion for Warren Buffett asked me: “So what do you do? Do you “copycat” what he buys, strictly following his ‘moves'(investments), and his portfolio?” I said “No, of course not! One of the first things he taught me was to think for myself”. “This is not a business in which you ask opinions or take polls. You focus on facts. This is a business in which you think!” I was surprised that he was surprised by my answer, but then I thought about the “Super Investor of Graham and Doddsville”, and Walter Schloss and so on so forth.. In the end, I was surprised that I was surprised by his surprise!
I felt that he was skeptical about my direct answer. I had the impression that academics tend to focus so much on “managing risk” that when they are indeed right about something, they just put it down to “a standard case of over-confidence”, and therefore continue to avoid making any decision.

Several modern “portfolio theories” were also prevalent, and occasionally fashionable, in previous decades. Ignoring most of them and focusing only on the principles that I clearly understood was a key factor for my investment education.

The “Nebraskan Cradle” I got on board with mainly focuses on what businesses are worth.
The combination of art and science is what really suits me. Moreover, I still believe that it is a crucial building block when considering and evaluating stocks to allocate capital and to buy.
That brief conversation with the CFA professor came to my mind again recently when I sold the airline stock (for a substantial profit) I bought in April 2020. It was a year ago that Buffett sold the same airline. Warren and I clearly had two very different opinions about the situation. A perfect demonstration of my hypothesis for that professor in Warsaw; thanks to Warren, after many years of experience, I was able to disagree with Buffett himself, my personal hero and master! Moreover, I did the same thing with a well-known bank stock that Berkshire sold about a year ago or so.  At end of last summer, I started buying it quite aggressively at a certain price level. When the price went too high (from my “valuation standpoint”), I stopped buying.
So 60 years after it was written, Philip Fisher’s dedication in his second book, “Paths to Wealth through Common Stocks” still applies and is wonderful: “This book is dedicated to all investors, large and small, who do not adhere to the philosophy: Everyone seems to believe it so it must be so.”
 
In life, solitude can be a demanding companion, but in the investment world, it can be a blessing.

If you think that being a professional investor is like any other job, switch to something else. If you are gifted at evaluating businesses, you don’t need advisers or consulting specialists, you just need a quiet room.

Want to get in touch?

We’d love to hear from you

Last posts

All the rest is noise

Marcus Aurelius wrote his “Meditations” as a reminder to himself to daily practice the virtues he sought in life. He wasn’t trying to be a teacher and he probably didn’t expect to be a writer. I think we should try in our personal and professional life to do just the same, Focus on our own goals, not on what others think or expect from us.  

How miserable life would be if one tried merely to impress others. A life many people spend buying things they don’t like to impress people that don’t like them, desperately trying to be recognized or remembered without investing any time getting clarity, peace of mind, or gaining wisdom.   

How difficult is to recognize all the extrinsic factors that can only harm you? How difficult is to ask yourself: “Am I in control of my emotions and my life? Am I possessed by my properties or material things or do I possess them?” “Am I ready and prepared to face the storm?” Am I able to exercise with Wisdom and intention my “reasoned choice”, as Epictetus called it? And am I capable of understanding what is behind my “reasoned choice” and what is just opinion, or is out of my control?  

We force ourselves to do many things, just because everybody is doing it. We end up losing control of our lives and our goals and desires. We do things that have no impact on us achieving our true goals and desires, all because we don’t simply take the time to ascertain what we really want in our life. If, on a rare occasion, one finds the time to do so, more often than not, one isn’t emotionally prepared to handle it and is even afraid to discover what is really important. So we don’t even try and yet, we’re still afraid of failing. Stoics say: just try. Nobody can be perfect and not everyone can be a sage. But trying means to be a better person than the day before. And if done with determination every day, it could lead to more happiness and tranquility than rage or tediousness. Stoics (just like Buffett) try to “Enjoy every day” in this wonderful journey called life; this always surprising pursuit in which you can “spend each day as if it were your last”, and as Marcus Aurelius wrote: “Without frenzy, laziness or any pretending”. 

There’s a lot of the Stoic philosophy in the unpretentious, but solid viewpoint of the world in the great “Value Investors”. It’s unplanned incidentally, because it’s a natural outcome of the common sense that is not regarded as precious as it really is because it seems too simple. Its principles for living a good life are “just so simple” as Charlie Munger said numerous times. In my experience, it is not always easy when you really have to apply those principles and values to your everyday life. Especially in 2021, a world in which noise is constant and overwhelming. And the strength required to cut it must be great. That’s why for me, today more than ever, the Stoics and their vision are critical for a happy life and happy investing. We need to have a sound mind, that can think and live outside the box, while not being reclusive or withdrawn. Observing all that is around us with bright eyes and inquisitive brains. All the rest is just noise.  

Feel free to stoically gather together your thoughts about this article and send me a comment to:

marco@blikebuffett.com 

The power of Inactivity

I’ve experienced as a business owner what hard work really means; working from 04.30 am to midnight, driven by a burning desire to accomplish your goals. In my case, the few years committed to working in this unrealistic way, combined with a specific talent for the Real Estate brokerage business, paid off.

But then, at a certain point, you have to stop and think. You have to find the time to ask yourself where you are going with it all. Ask yourself if you’re managing your life in the way you want to and how and if you’re getting what you want to. Moreover, you must ask yourself if there’s a way to accomplish more by doing less. The truth is, it may be not worth working like a mad dog your entire life, even if you like the business you are in. There are few people who sincerely dislike having friends or going out to a nice restaurant with someone you enjoy spending time with. Or maybe even experiencing the joy of having a son or a daughter to share your life with.

And what if taking the time to do nothing would bring more profitability to you in the long term? What if your level of happiness and ability to better analyze things (at a slower pace) would increase your chance of making more money in the future?

Often what is counter-intuitive is worth considering. Contemplate this: in life and in the investment world, every now and then you have to take the road less traveled. The most important thing is that you do so after thinking it over rationally. If you just jump from one meeting to another and your day is constantly full of appointments, you’ll probably miss the next big opportunity; the one that you should be ready for because you’re unlikely to get a second chance at. Remember such opportunities come to those who are prepared and are able to recognize those opportunities as opportunities.

Those who minds sifted through all the noise and the hustle and bustle to make decisions based on facts and reasoning. The independent thinkers who took enough time being ‘idle’ to equip themselves emotionally to identify these opportunities. It is important to take advantage of the downtime you had in the in the past to be ready for when the right time comes, and you have to take a swing. And to just take a small swing, (“doing it in a small scale”says Warren), is basically the same as not doing it all; in your investment life you will not find many big opportunities. If your facts and reasoning are right; if they are in your area of competence, it doesnt matter who agrees with you or not. You gotta swing.

So, in the end, (as usual) the majority of things everybody believes about money and investment is wrong. They think it must be complicated and you have to look for risky options to get rich and make money; that it is exhausting, takes complete dedication, and more busywork that most people could endure. Well, it’s not true. It requires more, actually. It requires sophisticated slacking. A path that is, pretty much uncharted, and unique for every human being. If it truly were only sweat and taking risks, then almost anybody could do it. Your burning desire to succeed must drive you to the adventure you love, not into slavery just for money.

If it turns you on, it will be successful. If it drives your best thoughts and qualities, it will make you happy. And rich.

Sono occupato, sto pensando..

Intendiamoci, io sono un naturale “hard worker” e non ho nulla contro i grandi lavoratori. Non parliamo di questo. Io vorrei sottolineare come l’iperattività forzata non porti i risultati che si crede. Se lavoro molto è perchè forse non lavoro mai. Investo con coraggio del tempo a trovare cio’ che soddisfa la mia natura. Persisto a concentrarmi seriamente su cio’ che mi riesce meglio e mi piace fare e lascio perdere il resto. O almeno ci provo. Ci ho messo anni per riuscirci. Odio per esempio il bricolage ed i lavori manuali. Perchè dovrei imparare a farli (male) togliendo il lavoro ad un bravo handyman? E’ facile solo a dirsi, infatti la maggior parte delle persone perde questa concentrazione e spreca la vita attendendo la fine del supplizio quotidiano che sopporta dal lunedi’ al venerdi’. Spendere 5 giorni per guadagnarne 2 non mi sembra un “good arbitrage”. L’attesa della pensione è un’altra tragedia che non condivido.

Piu’ che il lusso, il denaro, la capacità di comprare “comforts”, nella vita gioca a favore della felicita’ un genuino, quotidiano  entusiasmo svincolato dal “dovere”. Senza poter scegliere di essere inattivi e senza la giusta distanza da troppi stimoli esterni è difficile rimanere concentrati sulle cose o sulle persone realmente importanti per noi. Trovate il tempo per rifletterci…

(..continua..) 

Feel free to send your comments in italian or english at:

marco@blikebuffett.com

Non fare molto, sarà un successo..

L’efficienza o meglio il suo mito puo’ uccidervi. Cosi’ come la famosa frase “a tutti i costi” anche il principio “efficienza e produttività sempre” e nessun tempo morto.. puo’ mettere piu’ facilmente voi in cassa da morto che il tempo. Il concetto stesso di tempo morto è inesistente per l’uomo saggio che sa maneggiare il “saper far niente”.

L’otium dei latini di scolastica memoria puo’ essere uno dei piu’ sofisticati e al tempo stesso produttivi impieghi del tempo che ci è concesso. Sia da dedicare al business che alla vita in generale. Non avere un minuto perchè sempre impegnati in qualcosa e appena liberi ri-impegnarsi a colmare il vuoto nell’agenda è una autocondanna  al che le cose non migliorino, non progrediscano e non cambino.

I businesses piu’ produttivi e le attività piu’ remunerative sono quelle in cui si pensa. E pensare richiede uno sforzo di serenità e riposo che solo il saper fare niente puo’ regalare. Ritagliarsi il proprio tempo e proteggerlo lontano dagli ossessionati del multitasking e dei lavori forzati è un lavoro dal quale la persona di successo non puo’ sottrarsi. A lungo termine i risultati sono prodigiosi. A breve termine l’ilarità e il ghigno dei nemici del “benessere” (sia economico che spirituale) saranno la vostra momentanea ricompensa.

Sembrare efficienti è il contrario della concretezza. Fare le cose per farle e avere la sensazione di essere efficienti porta alla mancanza di pianificazione e di analisi dei risultati “veri”. Dei fatti concreti. Una giornata troppo densa o una settimana stra-piena possono essere anche generatrici di errori e di danni irreparabili (o che durano mesi o anni). Sbagliare è importante ed istruttivo nel mondo del business (ne abbiamo molti esempi) e puo’ non essere “Tempo perso” riparare i danni causati. Ma io personalmente preferisco imparare dagli errori degli altri piu’ che dai miei.  E per imparare debbo “sprecare” qualche ora a pensare e studiare a fondo cio’ che realmente puo’ arricchirmi a lungo termine e conviene fare.  E soprattutto cio’ che conviene non fare. Magari perchè è semplicemente troppo difficile. Dire “NO, grazie”. Essere ‘”old school” nel gestire la propria agenda è oggi piu’ che mai oro. Rilassatevi prima di pensare a grossi affari. Di solito i meno “efficaci” (e pure deboli) sono coloro che devono pomparsi la mente con concetti-steroidi che prevedono di anestetizzare le “small talk” ed essere solo business in ogni singolo efficiente istante della giornata.

Buffett durante una acquisition enorme delle sue se ne ando’ a vedere a teatro la recita dei nipoti. In una puntata di “The secret millionaires club” insegna come abbia un solo unico impegno a cui dedicarsi nel corso di tutta la settimana. E prima di iniziare a lavorarci si mette a suonare l’hukulele. Non solo, in questo modo gli rimane tutto il tempo libero per fronteggiare eventuali imprevisti o emergenze. E quindi agire, subito. Vigore e determinazione di acciaio usano lo spazio e il tempo attorno di cui hanno bisogno per scoccare il colpo giusto al momento giusto. Siete sempre a navigare tra il fumo dei meetings, riunioni, groups, power teams etc? Se non avete tempo per fermarvi e cercare il vostro mondo, vi costringete a vivere nel mondo che gli altri costruiscono per voi.

(..continua…)

“Pensa che ti passa”

Vi consiglio un libro in italiano che mi ha seguito in valigia e poi in tasca nel recente arrivo a Roma dagli States. Breve ma efficacissimo: “Pensa che ti passa” di Francesco Muzzarelli  (Emi, gli infralibri) Sottotitolo: “Usare la testa per non farsi male”. Va via d’un fiato ed è un piacere per chi come noi è interessato da sempre ad usare la Razionalità e “non farsi male”(non solo finanziariamente). Ma, soprattutto, inserisco questa mia piccola recensione sotto la categoria “The Business of Life” perchè, come ho scritto spesso in precedenti articoli, prima di ogni avventura deve esserci un corretto esercizio di gestione delle proprie emozioni e della propria vita. Come vediamo e come affrontiamo le cose è il filtro principale che ci permette di vivere al meglio il nostro diritto alla Felicità. Come interpretiamo gli inevitabili ostacoli dell’esistenza e come reagiamo e conviviamo, se necessario, con essi?  Muzzarelli, partendo dal “Sursum Corda” (in alto i cuori!) ci porta per mano in un breve ma affascinante viaggio tra cervello e cuore e attraverso il nostro sistema nervoso. Ben Franklin, Warren Buffett e Charlie Munger, piu’ la mia defunta zia nata nel 1926, sarebbero molto daccordo con l’autore. Tutti loro non dimenticano mai di rammentarmi che la forza del carattere e del temperamento e’ cio’ che contraddistingue il grande investitore e l’uomo equilibrato che non si lascia travolgere dalle emozioni nei momenti cruciali. Io ho imparato tanto da questi grandi per non cedere mai alla disperazione e al vittimismo, e ho trovato in questa piccola “guida” di Muzzarelli, un riassunto, quasi un breviario, che si puo’ leggere e rileggere anche a piccoli pezzi, aprendolo e riaprendolo a caso. Pezzetti, ogni giorno, magari al mattino, prima di iniziare a fare “danni” a noi stessi e agli altri lasciando troppo aperte le valvole dell’istinto e le impennate dell'”amigdala”. Siamo tutti umani, è un percorso da affrontare a piccoli passi e da rinnovare e costruire ogni ora, ogni giorno. Cio’ che pensiamo del nostro presente, come guidiamo i nostri pensieri sull’oggi e sul futuro, influisce sulle nostre scelte e quindi sulle inevitabili conseguenze di esse.  Come interpretiamo accadimenti e realtà e come possiamo intervenire e vederci a nostro agio in essa sono la chiave della nostro vero “stare bene”. Ricordatevi, non saranno i soldi (oltre certo un livello minimo che garantisce i bisogni primari) a garantire per forza il nostro successo (successo “a tutti i costi” è una frase pericolosa!). L’idea del successo,ha detto Warren una volta, e’ talmente personale che io non so cosa possa essere. Ma so cos’è la Felicità, perchè io sono felice e mi godo (so godermi) ogni giorno la vita. Mi piace la vita che faccio (comprese le sue inevitabili difficoltà) perchè l’ho costruita giorno dopo giorno senza rinunciare ad essere me stesso. A scegliere cio’ che va bene al mio essere “Io”. Come mi disse nel 2004 Ted Greene : “Marco, tu devi essere Marco“. Per me ha significato Rincorri cio’ che ti fa felice, che si adatta al tuo carattere e alle tue caratteristiche e qualità. Trova cio’ per cui sei realmente portato. Accetta i limiti ed i difetti e stai lontano da cio’ che non conosci, non capisci e che ti potrà fare male. Non significa non avventurarsi, anzi! Significa al contrario scegli la giusta avventura e preparati ad accettare gli errori che farai, perchè ci saranno. Inevitabilmente. Ragionando cosi’ la quantità di disagi e dolori che ho evitato è stata sorprendente.La quantità di maggiore Felicità acquisita cosi’ negli ultimi 18 anni e’ stata sorprendente. Con essa e’ aumentata anche la ricchezza netta, il patrimonio materiale ed il mio patrimonio di relazioni, amicizie, umiltà e disponibilità verso gli altri. Vedo nell’altro le mie stesse difficoltà e penso che forse ha avuto anche una giornata peggiore della mia, prima di giudicarlo sommariamente.

La quantità di conoscenza, e libri letti che mi hanno regalato molte piu’ ore gradevoli? Una ricchezza incalcolabile. Mi hanno regalato anche l’accettazione di una “ignoranza enciclopedica” che porto in giro con me con orgoglio. Noi leggiamo, leggiamo e cerchiamo ogni giorno di migliorare e cosi’ ci sentiamo felicemente inadeguati. Accettiamo l’inevitabile: la forza di gravità dei nostri limiti. Grazie a questi ultimi e non alla presunzione riusciamo a volare se vogliamo, persino chiusi in una stanza o costretti a “scrivere da un cuscino”. Sentirsi a proprio agio con il disagio è la vera forza e la vera garanzia di Felicità. Francesco Muzzarelli ha capito e scritto con semplicità (meglio di me) molte cose come queste nel suo agile libro. E lo ringrazio per averlo scritto in maniera semplice ma non banale, alla portata di tutti, ma rigoroso. Charlie Munger ha detto una volta che le risposte dovrebbero essere tre: “Si, No, e Troppo Difficile”. La cassettina con dentro le pratiche troppo difficili che Warren ha sulla sua scrivania in ufficio ad Omaha Nebraska, è la piu’ importante. E’ nostro compito capire cosa dovrebbe starci dentro e soprattutto cosa ancora ci “arrovelliamo” e carbonizziamo il cervello e l’anima a tenere fuori.

Se penso a quante cose potevano andare storte oggi è un miracolo che sono qua al sicuro a scrivere al Computer quello che mi pare. In definitiva l’obiettivo è “pensare” come Warren (o almeno provarci) per potere con sincerità arrivare a rispondere come lui a chi ci chiede “Come stai?” :la frase “Im delighted to be here”.  “Sono Felice di essere qui” .

Stay Happy, 

Marco Turco 

marco@blikebuffett.com

“Everyone seems to believe it..”

A few years ago, when I was in Warsaw for my CFA level I preparation course, an “academician” (professor) knowing my passion for Warren Buffett asked me: “So what do you do? Do you “copycat” what he buys, strictly following his ‘moves'(investments), and his portfolio?” I said “No, of course not! One of the first things he taught me was to think for myself”. “This is not a business in which you ask opinions or take polls. You focus on facts. This is a business in which you think!” I was surprised that he was surprised by my answer, but then I thought about the “Super Investor of Graham and Doddsville”, and Walter Schloss and so on so forth.. In the end, I was surprised that I was surprised by his surprise!
I felt that he was skeptical about my direct answer. I had the impression that academics tend to focus so much on “managing risk” that when they are indeed right about something, they just put it down to “a standard case of over-confidence”, and therefore continue to avoid making any decision.

Several modern “portfolio theories” were also prevalent, and occasionally fashionable, in previous decades. Ignoring most of them and focusing only on the principles that I clearly understood was a key factor for my investment education.

The “Nebraskan Cradle” I got on board with mainly focuses on what businesses are worth.
The combination of art and science is what really suits me. Moreover, I still believe that it is a crucial building block when considering and evaluating stocks to allocate capital and to buy.
That brief conversation with the CFA professor came to my mind again recently when I sold the airline stock (for a substantial profit) I bought in April 2020. It was a year ago that Buffett sold the same airline. Warren and I clearly had two very different opinions about the situation. A perfect demonstration of my hypothesis for that professor in Warsaw; thanks to Warren, after many years of experience, I was able to disagree with Buffett himself, my personal hero and master! Moreover, I did the same thing with a well-known bank stock that Berkshire sold about a year ago or so.  At end of last summer, I started buying it quite aggressively at a certain price level. When the price went too high (from my “valuation standpoint”), I stopped buying.
So 60 years after it was written, Philip Fisher’s dedication in his second book, “Paths to Wealth through Common Stocks” still applies and is wonderful: “This book is dedicated to all investors, large and small, who do not adhere to the philosophy: Everyone seems to believe it so it must be so.”
 
In life, solitude can be a demanding companion, but in the investment world, it can be a blessing.

If you think that being a professional investor is like any other job, switch to something else. If you are gifted at evaluating businesses, you don’t need advisers or consulting specialists, you just need a quiet room.